· Master Your Grill
How To Winterize Your Barbecue

So you want to know how to prepare you barbecue for Winter? Though it saddens us that you don't plan on grilling all Winter long, we get it. They don't call Canada 'The Great White North' for nothin'. It gets bloody cold out and sometimes we can get several feet of snow in one day. While some brave souls are willing to bust out the shovel and clear a path to their barbecue, we can't expect it from all of you.

To Winterize Your Grill

Clean it, clean it good 

Make sure that there are no traces of food straggling behind. This is what we like to call a critter magnet. Animals seek out shelter and food in the winter months. Don't make your barbecue a sitting duck.

To clean your grills, let your barbecue preheat for about 15 minutes. Turn it off. Once it's cool enough, take a wire brush and clean off any remaining bits of food or grease.  

Next you'll want to make sure that the flavourizer bars and warming racks are also clean, and finish up by wiping down the barbecue with degreaser and getting rid of the grease tray from inside the cart. Rinse off any remaining degreaser or barbecue goes boom!  

 

Cover Up

Just like you put on your spiffy parka to protect you from the elements, you need to put a parka (cover) on your barbecue. Do this once the barbecue is cool and dry. No body likes opening up their cover to a mouldy barbecue in the Spring. Consider yourself warned. Make sure the straps are secured so the cover doesn't blow off.

It's much more pleasant to spend $50 on a new barbecue cover, than having to spend $500 on a new barbecue because you skipped this step. 

 

Storage

If you won't be using your barbecue you don't need it to be hooked up to a fuel source, so unplug your gas from the wall or remove your propane tank. If you have the space, we recommend storing the barbecue in your garage or under a covered part of your patio. Note, it is not safe to store propane tanks in the garage.

If you have cast iron grates, it's best to bring those bad boys inside. Temperature changes can cause them to crack and moisture in the air can cause them to rust. You should season them before you put them away.

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