· Recipes
Harvest Roasted Vegetable Recipe

Ingredients:
 Whatever root vegetables turn you on.  We used carrots, parsnips, beets, potatoes, garlic and red onions
- Olive oil
- Salt
- Lemons
   
Assemble your ingredients.
let your vegetables soak in cold water for half an hour. 
Important: 
let your vegetables soak in cold water for half an hour.  This helps keep them moist in the dry environment of the barbecue. After soaking I recommend you par-boil or microwave any of the denser vegetables such as potatoes or parsnips for a few minutes.  You don’t want to ‘finish’ them but it’s nice to soften them up so they’re on the same playing field as the softer, wimpier vegetables like the onions.

Pour on the olive oil.  Use lots 
Pour on the olive oil.  Use lots (remember – “good” cholesterol).  Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.

Put vegetables on the barbecue in your wok topper. Put vegetables on the barbecue in your wok topper.  The barbecue has to be reasonably hot (about 400 degrees) but, ideally, you should be using indirect heat.  In this case, it pays to have a nice, big barbecue where you can get the vegetables away from the direct heat.  Let the vegetables roast for about thirty minutes.  Stir them every five or ten minutes so that the vegetables on the bottom don’t get too charred.

After about twenty minutes, spritz the vegetables with some lemon.  
After about twenty minutes, spritz the vegetables with some lemon.  Throw the squished lemons on top of the vegetables.

Stay vigilant, stay alert.  Don’t burn your vegetables. 
Stay vigilant, stay alert.  Don’t burn your vegetables.  Keep them roasting until all the vegetables are soft.  Should take about thirty minutes. 
It if takes longer – don’t panic.

Serve.  Eat.  Enjoy. (Note:  my favourite vegetable in this recipe is the beets.  Roasting them this way brings out all the natural sweet flavour. ) 
Serve.  Eat.  Enjoy. (Note:  my favourite vegetable in this recipe is the beets.  Roasting them this way brings out all the natural sweet flavour.  This surprises me because, for most of my life, I’d go seriously out of my way to avoid the pickled beets my Danish grandmother served every Thanksgiving and Christmas.  For years I thought “beets” was Danish for “poison your grandson”.  Sorry Grandma.)